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Professional Coaching for the Competitive and Defensive Shooter


Useful Stuff for Student Alumni


The "rectangle target" (currently taking suggestions for a better name)

rectangle target








Purpose:

This drill reinforces process over results.


Overall Goal:

Fire 6 shots per rectangle, in 5 seconds, for 6 consecutive strings (36 shots total), at 7 yards. All shots must be within the rectangle, no make-up shots.


Progression:

Begin working the drill at 3 yards. When you're confident and able to shoot this drill clean at 3 yards, increase the distance to 5 yards, and then 7. Try both strong hand and weak hand variations for additional challenge.  


Procedure:

1. WARM UP: Begin by shooting this drill with no par time, for 3 individual strings of fire, at a distance of 3yds.

[Step Notes: Yes, 3 yards, even if you're an advanced shooter. Shooting at 3 yards tempts us to look over our sights, and watch holes appear in the target. Challenge yourself to stay focused on the process, by maintaining grip pressure and sight focus, and reading the sights. Removing the time component allows a shooter to concentrate on proper technique and process.]


2.WARM UP PART 2 - ADD YOUR PAR TIME:  For the next 3 strings, add your 5-second par time.

[Step Notes: Timers cause panic. Instead of trying to rush 6 rounds into the par time, focus on shot quality. If you can only draw and fire 2-3 rounds in the available timeframe, THAT'S OK. Make sure those 2-3 rounds are of the highest quality and accuracy. Shot accountability and maintaining the process are priority. If you let go of the process in pursuit of result, you will fail.]


3. RUN THE DRILL: Run a complete set of 6 strings, with 6 shots (OR the number of high-quality shots you have determined you can deliver in the available time).

[Step Notes: Recognizing your limits, and some self-assessment, is extremely important during this step. If you're scrambling to get 6 shots in, you may be sacrificing small things to do so. If you can't shoot 6 QUALITY shots, shoot 5. You will not improve by repeating a faulty process. Recognize the presence of deficiencies, and adjust accordingly.]


History, Performance, and Diagnostic Notes:

This drill is inspired by The Garcia Dot Drill. The Garcia Dot Drill was created by Frank Garcia, the owner of Universal Shooting Academy in Frostproof, FL. It utilizes a target consisting of six, 2” dots. The goal of the Garcia Dot Drill is to draw and shoot 6 rounds into a 2” dot, in 5 seconds, at 7 yards. Any shots outside of the dot are considered a fail. This drill is repeated for each of the 6 dots on the target.


This drill, using six 2x3” rectangles (“A-zones”) is a better representation of the types of targets we use in USPSA, and accounts for dot-over-bore offset considerations at close distances.


If you're having trouble with this drill, pay close attention to patterns of hits, and how they may be a result of inconsistent grip pressures, sight pictures, or combination of both.


THE ANTI-PEP TALK:

If this drill feels easy, and you aren't already a super-GM with our own Wikipedia page, take a good, hard look at your process. If you saw your sight picture slip a time or two, but you still ended up with lucky hits, it was not a good run. Lucky hits are not the same as intentional, purposeful hits. You are not doing this to teach yourself to depend on luck, you are doing this to build consistency and skill. You are here to refine and perfect your process. If your process was flawed, be honest and harsh with yourself - practice until it is not. You will not improve by repeating a faulty process. It is going to be hard, it is going to be frustrating, and you will get tired, and feel tempted to overlook minor hiccups, but you cannot. To do so would be to do youself a disservice. Do not practice until you get it right, practice until you can't get it wrong.  


GET THE TARGET